Weeping Siberian Peashrub

Spring CHR 081Latin name: Caragana arborescens

Variety: Walker (10-15 ft tall) or Pendula (4-6 ft tall)

Location: Front garden

Origin: From Siberia and Manchuria

Description:

  • small ornamental tree
  • cascades of pea-shaped flowers appear early to mid-July
  • fine textured deciduous foliage
  • nitrogen fixing
  • grafted?
  • edible pealike vegetable is bitter; useful food for poultry crops or wildlife

Maintenance: trim branches that reach the ground. Removed crossing, dead or diseased stems at their point of origin. Thin the top branches to 2″ apart to allow air circulation.

Zone: USDA 2-8

Sources:

http://www.ehow.com/info_8129455_weeping-pea-tree.html

http://www.natronacountyconservationdistrict.com/images/Ca_Ch_Deciduous.pdf

Tartarian Honeysuckle Bush

Blooming at the end of May 2014

Blooming at the end of May 2014

Latin name: Lonicera tatarica

Variety: Rosea has rose colored flowers with pink on the inside

Location: Front garden

History: From Russia and Central Asia

Description:

  • a multistemmed deciduous shrub
  • branching is upright and then overarching toward the tips
  • dense and twiggy
  • 10′ to 12′ tall with an equal width
  • shape is rounded

Prohibited Noxious Species in NH

Spirea

Blooming Spirea

Blooming Spirea

Latin name: Spirea

Variety: Unknown, White blossoms in late May

Location: Front garden

Origin:

Description:

  • large showy flowering bush
  • slender panicles
  • Does not like alkaline soils

Maintenance: Prune back as much as 1/3 in early spring before growth; Add layer of compost out to dripline each spring; Add 2 inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeks. Deadhead spent flowers to induce second bloom in 3 weeks.

Zone: 3-8

Sources:

http://www.garden.org/plantguide/?q=show&id=2103

 

Orange Azalea

Blooming Orange Azalea

Blooming Orange Azalea May 2013

Latin name: Rhododendron x

Variety: poss. Tangerine Delight

Location: Front garden

History: hybrid of native species

Description:

  • deciduous with brilliant blooms
  • adaptable to environmental stresses
  • fast growing shrub
  • hardy in zones 5-9
  • part shade, blooms mid-spring

Dogwood

Summer Dogwood Flowers and Bracts

Summer Dogwood Flowers and Bracts

Latin name: Cornus kousa

Variety: poss. Little Beauty

Location: Front garden

Origin: native to Japan, Korea and China

Description:

  • small deciduous tree
  • green “flower” surrounded by four white pointed bracts in early June and lasting about 6 weeks
  • opposite, simple leaves elliptic to ovate in shape
  • autumn leaves turn red or red-purple
  • fruit is dull, raspberry red, pendant in late August to October
  • edible but mealy fruit

Maintenance:

Zone: USDA to zone 5

Sources:

http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/c/corkou/corkou1.html

http://www.eattheweeds.com/cornus-kousa-a-dog-gone-good-dogwood-2/

http://www.natronacountyconservationdistrict.com/images/Ca_Ch_Deciduous.pdf

Clematis

Latin name: Ranunculaceae clematis

Variety:

Clematis unknown variety

Clematis unknown variety

  • Cameo Pink Hybridized by van Laeken; Year of Registration or Introduction: 1994
  •  and 1 unknown light pink with fuschia stamen (blooming 6/1/14-

Location: Front garden

Origin: native to Orient

Description:

  • Cameo Pink is an early bloomer pale pink or rose/mauve with single striped blooms
  • flowering vine that loves sweet soil (add 1 cup of lime per plant or Magic-Cal or 2 handfuls of wood ash every spring)
  • stalk twist around support
  • needs at least 6 hours of direct sun and good air circulation
  • water often and deep especially when flowering
  • shade soil around base with perennials in summer to keep roots cool and large upright cobblestone in winter to stabilize freezing and thawing
  • mulch with 2″ of bark mulch

Maintenance: Don’t prune heavily but remove dead or damaged wood. After 4-5 years, when there are fewer blooms, cut back older stems to 18″ in early Spring before there is new growth. Heavy feeder – try Bio-Tone with Mycorrhizae or Dr. Earth with Pro-biotic both Spring and Fall

Zone: USDA to zone 4a

Sources:

Paul Parent’s newletter dated June 12, 2014 http://paulparent.com/index.php?id=217

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/104995/#b